Category Archives: art

Variations on a Hanaci Girl

It’s often interesting to see an artist’s early work. This one, by Gustav Klimt, caught and held my attention. It’s called “Study of the Head of a Hanaci Girl” (c1883) (Appendix I) and variations on that theme, such as “Head Study of a Girl von Hana.” So of course I had to try a couple collage-style variations on the theme.

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The Quinces Again, A Pile of French Novels, and Other Rainy Day Pursuits

I could not seem to leave van Gogh’s Quinces alone, particularly after my friend Curt* alerted me to abstracts by Serge Poliakoff. I intended to do more with the Quince collage above, but a Poliakoff cut-out admonished me that it wished to stand alone.

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Melon and Lemon, Quince and Marguerite

Gaughin had many talents, as we know. I was, however, completely unaware of his talent for still life—until I ran across Melon and Lemon (c. 1900), in which he shows us what makes a lemon such a magnificent object to depict. So, of course, I had to make a collage (actually two) of this painting. Above, you’ll find the lemon and melon superimposed on Tamara Lempicka’s Abstract Composition (1960).

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Pollock among the Teapots

Undeterred by rainy weather, we headed out to an exhibit of new paintings by Angel Otero. We were well rewarded for braving the elements, for this was indeed a dazzling display. I learned of Otero stumbling across one of his works online and was eager to see his work “live.” Otero’s painting process is unusual. He makes “’oilskins,’ which are created from paint poured onto glass and peeled off in sheets after drying. These skins are then grafted onto the artist’s canvas or sculpture. Otero combines them with other materials including resin, spray paint, and silicone.” [cite]

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The Golden Shoe

When we were out walking a few days ago, we spotted a golden shoe propped up against a balustrade. There was only the one. So, of course, we had to photograph it. Then, of course, I had to try my hand at collages based on the shoe. Above, the shoe is set in a painting by Ugo Flumiani (1876-1938) said to be titled “Glimpse of the Canal,” though I haven’t been able to confirm that.

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