Tag Archives: Dylan Mattingly

July Miscellany, with music by Jaeger, Mattingly & Trapani & performances by Dhegrae & Contemporaneous

That’s Robert Louis Stevenson contemplating the proceedings, courtesy John Singer Sargent. The proceedings include, among other things, El café by Joaquín Torres-García and the Cabinet of Geology and Mineralogy from the announcement of a project by Mark Dion at Vassar College.

Next are images of two ancient vases accompanied by a cut-up wrapper, seeds, and labels.

And here, Piero Della Francesca’s 15th C Portrait of Battista Sforza twines with Juan Gris’s The Man at the Café (1914). I’ve had the Della Francesca post card, picked up in Florence, for many moons.

Last, Braque’s The Terrace at the Hotel Mistral (1907) is paired with Matisse’s Pink Onions (1906-07), both accompanied, among other things, by a sticker of a flying machine from Lisbon and a ticket to the Palatine Chapel, Palermo.

Listening List

Shawn Jaeger‘s Resignation, performed by Lucy Dhegrae.

From Jaeger’s website:

“Resignation” takes its title from the American folk melody of the same name, better known as the tune for the Christian hymn, “My Shepherd Will Supply My Need,” with words, by Isaac Watts (1675-1748), paraphrasing Psalm 23. My song is built of fragments of text and music from the hymn—re-ordered and frozen (as if film stills), and repeated.

The score may be found here.

Christopher Trapani‘s Can’t Feel at Home, from Waterlines, performed by Lucy Dhegrae.

For more about Waterlines, click here.

Dylan Mattingly‘s Jubilee, from his opera-in-progress, Stranger Love, performed by Contemporaneous, with David Bloom conducting.

For more about Stranger Love, click here.

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Credits: Sources for the quotations may be found at the links in the text. The collages and photographs, as always on the blog unless indicated otherwise, are mine.

Spaghetti Western: Contemporaneous in the Spiegeltent

Contemporaneous in the Spiegeltent, warming up for the concert

Contemporaneous in the Spiegeltent, warming up for the concert

It is a measure of the power of music, in the hands of Contemporaneous, that the silly season engulfing us decamped, wholly vanquished, within the first bars of Vicenti Alexim’s adroit arrangement of Ennio Morricone’s Il triello. The occasion was Contemporaneous’s appearance at Bard’s Summer Music Festival, the focus of which this year is “Puccini and His World.” Continue reading

Visionary Magic on a Heroic Scale

Ebbets FieldThursday, May 19, 2016, marked the premiere of Dylan Mattingly’s monumental work for piano, Achilles Dreams of Ebbets Field. Three years ago or thereabouts, the vital, fearless pianist Kathleen Supové invited Mattingly to compose a work for piano—anything he wanted, of any length. Could Supové, or even Mattingly himself, outsized dreamer though he is, have predicted just how big it would become? Continue reading

Visual Music: Contemporaneous at Murray’s Sanctuary

The Sanctuary at Murray's February 12, 2016

The Sanctuary at Murray’s February 12, 2016

On Thursday, February 11, 2016, Contemporaneous, the new music chamber orchestra that now makes its home in New York City, presented its program, Laws of Nature, in an incredibly cool-looking Brooklyn venue, Pioneer Works. The next night, to my grateful hosannas, Contemporaneous came home to the Hudson Valley—to Tivoli, a stone’s throw from Bard College, where the orchestra’s life began. Tivoli is one of those small Hudson Valley villages of unassuming, arty charm. I’ve visited its main street eateries, shops, and gallery many times, yet I hadn’t known about Murray’s, a former church converted into a concert space, café, and art gallery, and let me tell you, as soon as I walked in the door, I was ready to move in. Continue reading

My Year in Music 2015

The musicians of Contemporaneous

The musicians of Contemporaneous

Each year I realize yet again how impossible it is to choose among the highlights, let alone write about them with any intelligence. This year is likely to be the last time I make the attempt. Every musical experience is illuminating, above all live performances, but also, particularly with ongoing advances in camerawork and technology, watching and listening online. I’m grateful, too, for the opportunity to be part of communities who love classical music of all stripes and who are generous in sharing their own responses and knowledge. I’ve learned a great deal from so many, and I only hope I’ve been able to give something of value back. Continue reading