Category Archives: art

January Miscellany: Hoffman, Schubert, and Marie Vieux-Chauvet

Playing around: The image of a Hans Hoffman woodcut in an arts magazine proved an irresistible impulse for coloring between the lines. After all, I’d collected dozens of colored pencils some time back (they looked so very appealing on display in a local arts and stationery shop) and they’d been neglected for far too long. Spare buttons discovered in a winter decluttering session, a leaf stamp and ink pad, a couple British stamps, and a magazine image of tiles all got their moment in the sun as well. Continue reading

December Miscellany, with Lois Dodd & Germaine Tailleferre

Two Red Drapes and Part of White Sheet (1981)

I think you survive if you don’t fit anywhere.
—Lois Dodd [Faye Hirsch Monograph, p. 10]

Best is to view Lois Dodd’s paintings directly, as we did this week at the Alexandre Gallery.  If, however, commentary is desired to supplement the looking, listen to Dodd herself: Continue reading

Glitter and Be Gay: Art in Newburgh, New York

McCorkle, Dividing Plant Cell at Anaphase

The word came to us from Rome. No, not that one, but rather Rome, Georgia. Mery Lynn McCorkle, an artist who resides there presently, alerted us to an exhibit at Ann Street Gallery, in Newburgh, New York. Continue reading

An Operatic Apocalypse: The Drumf and the Rhinegold at Turn Park Art Space

Yesterday we took a day trip to West Stockbridge, Massachusetts, lured by the chance to hear two of our favorite singers, Lucy Dhegrae and Ariadne Greif. Well, OK, also, we’d missed earlier performances of The Drumf and the Rhinegold, and it was way past time to make up for that cultural lack. Continue reading

In an English Plague Village

Eyam Hall (from back garden)

Our book on the Peak District in England’s Midlands says of Eyam that “it will forever be known as the ‘plague village.’” As the story goes, the plague arrived in Eyam in 1665

In the house now known as the Plague Cottage . . . then occupied by a travelling tailor, who inadvertently introduced the plague to Eyam in a parcel of flea-infested cloth from London. The rector of Eyam, William Mompesson, persuaded most of the inhabitants to stay and seal off the village, even though many died from the disease. . . . [Simon Kirwan, Peak District Villages, pp. 44-45] Continue reading