Tag Archives: Agnes Martin

With Her Back To the World

The first time I saw a painting by Agnes Martin (or at least it was the first time I paid attention) was at the Dia:Beacon in 2007. The quotation on the wall appealed to me then and has ever since:

I want to draw a certain response. . . . Not a specific response but that quality of response from people when they leave themselves behind, often experienced in nature—an experience of simple joy. . . . the simple, direct going into a field of vision as you would cross an empty beach to look at the ocean. Continue reading

At the National Biscuit Company Carton Making and Printing Plant (a/k/a Dia:Beacon)

Inside Dia:Beacon

Inside Dia:Beacon

Sunflowers on Biscuit Factory salvaged wood (Susan Sylvester DiGilio)

Sunflowers on Biscuit Factory salvaged wood (Susan Sylvester DiGilio)

Not long after we first moved to the mid-Hudson Valley some years ago, we went on an expedition to the town of Beacon. We stopped at a lunch place that doubled as a gallery; the painting near our table, an artfully straightforward painting on wood salvaged from the local biscuit factory, appealed to us, so we inquired. The price was modest, and, after some hesitation about a splurge on what was not, after all, “high art,” we took it home. Ever since, this painting, of a cheerful vase of sunflowers sitting on a patchwork quilt, has greeted us on awakening. We’ve found it to be a happy way to start the day. Continue reading